0004b…A visit to Stoke Gifford in the late 19th Century

A visit to Stoke Gifford in the late 19th Century

A pretty little parish with many farms, consisting of the village of Great Stoke where we find the church and the two hamlets, of Harry Stoke and Little Stoke.

The vicarage in the incumbency of the Rev. Newman Tibbits, B.A. and is in the patronage of the Duke of Beaufort, who is lord of the manor and chief owner of the soil and to whom all the tenants owe their rents.

The church is an ancient Gothic edifice, dedicated to St. Michael, consisting of nave and aisle, with tower containing three bells, the Rev. Newman Tibbits, B.A being the incumbent. There is a school for children of both sexes, supported by subscription and the children’s pennies. The headmistress, Mrs Margaret Rowland, has some 50 pupils in her care.

The poor share in charitable bequests which produce some £12 per annum.

In Great Stoke the almost 400 inhabitants the village shop is kept by Richard Powell.

Should the wheels break on their carts or carriages they will be fixed by George Luton the wheelright and carpenter and any iron work will be the pleasure of Thomas Iles to create in his blacksmith’s forge on North Road. They can purchase beer from William Parker or to catch up with the latest parish matter in the Portcullis Inn run by Edwin and his wife Grace who moved here from her village in far away Cornwall. Should the wish to post a letter or conduct other business George Taylor the postmaster will help them and should they require repairs to their bicycle or a new machine George will be please to fix or build a new bike for them. Constable Arthur Jones keeps the peace stationed in the Police house in Rock Lane.

Source: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis 1831
STOKE-GIFFORD, a parish in the upper division of the hundred of Henbury, county of Gloucester, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Bristol, containing 376 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Bishop of Bristol, rated in the king’s books at £6, endowed with £275 private benefaction, and £600 royal bounty, and in the patronage of the Duke of Beaufort. The church is dedicated to St. Michael. John Silcocks, in 1741, bequeathed £200, directing the interest to be applied for teaching poor children of this parish and those of Almondsbury, Filton, and Winterbourne; and a school is supported, partly by this charity, and partly by the Dowager Duchess of Beaufort, in which twelve boys and twenty-four girls are educated.

Stoke Gifford Morris Gloucestershire Directory 1876
Stoke Gifford is a village and parish in Clifton union, containing, by the census of 1861, 445 inhabitants, and in 1871, 430 inhabitants, and 2277 acres; in the deanery and archdeaconry of Bristol, diocese of Gloucester and Bristol, hundred of Barton Regis, West Gloucestershire; near to the Patchway Station on the Bristol and South Wales Railway, 4 ½ miles north-west from Mangotsfield Station on the Midland Railway, 6 north from Bristol, 7 west from Chipping Sodbury, 16 north-west from Bath, and 115 from London. The vicarage in the incumbency of the Rev. Newman Tibbits, B.A., is valued at £60 per annum, and is in the patronage of the Duke of Beaufort, who is lord of the manor and chief owner of the soil. The church is an ancient Gothic edifice, dedicated to St. Michael, consisting of nave and aisle, with tower containing three bells. There is a school for children of both sexes, supported by subscription and the children’s pence. The poor have charitable bequests producing £12 per annum.